Can Post-Surgical Pain Be Cured?

Post-surgical pain is an accepted notion with virtually all major types of surgeries, and several of the more minor types of surgery, as well. Prior to surgery, your doctor will discuss the probability and severity of what you can expect with post-surgical pain. They will create a plan for managing this pain after the fact. This plan can include OTC medications, prescription painkillers, other types of prescription medications, and much more. In some cases, even diet and certain forms of exercise will be discussed.

However, an alarming number of individuals find themselves dealing with pain long after the suggested grace period. To put it another way, if you continue to experience a significant amount of pain and discomfort six months after your surgery, you are almost certainly dealing with some version of chronic pain.

When we appreciate this fact, the next question will inevitably turn to the notion of a cure. Can post-surgery pain be cured? Is it even worth trying?

The Cure For Post-Surgical Pain
In a broad sense, there is really no such thing as a cure for post-surgical pain. This is partially because the concept is quite simply far too vast. You cannot reasonably expect to develop a singular cure that can be applied to any situation that might qualify as post-surgical pain. While no one ever wants to close the book on curing a condition (or several conditions that fall under a larger heading), the focus with post-surgical pain leans more towards the subject of pain management.

If you are experiencing post-surgical pain, your healthcare provider is going to suggest management. With chronic pain control, there are two major goals that tend to define most management strategies. The first goal is to reduce the symptoms to the greatest extent possible. The second goal is to reduce not only the various emotional distresses inherent in enduring post-surgical pain, but to also reduce the functional limitations that can occur as a result of post-surgical pain. Within both of these larger goals, there is a great deal that can be attempted. Medications can be utilized in these situations, but in many cases, healthcare providers will look for management/reduction strategies that do not rely solely on OTC/prescription medications. Of course, one must consider the potential for abuse and addiction in these situations. Nonetheless, in the aftermath of surgery patients may be prescribed strong painkillers such as Tramadol, dihydrocodeine or some other form of codeine phosphate. Get more information here

It is also possible that the pain management will suggest a pain clinic. It is generally accepted that there are three major types of pain management clinics available to interested individuals.